Trains Magazine 2016 Photo Competition Award

I was excited to learn that my image entitled Bear Mountain Passages was awarded 2nd Place in the 2016 Trains Magazine photo contest with the theme being “Water”.

This image was the result of one of my extended day hiking trips as I described in my last post, “Recharge”. I had planned this hike for late in the afternoon so that I could watch the sun set from my vantage point and take advantage of the backlit bridges and train that would be part of my composition. I got the photo that I wanted, but also had the thrill of walking down a long trail in total blackness with only a flashlight to find my way.

I was very happy to have an image selected for this competition and found myself in good company as I know or have met all the selected photographers with the exception of the Grand Prize winner, Barry Gaston. Many times, I find myself disappointed at some of the selections and awards, but not this year, and agreed with the judges that Barry’s image of water droplets reflecting a bright orange BNSF locomotive, was the best of what was awarded. His image offers a very unique point of view, is creative and very visually engaging.

When submitting work to a contest, I have learned to quite trying to second-guess the judges and just submit work that I like and fits within the competition theme. So here are the other images that I submitted.

 

The Delaware River was originally a conduit for commerce by barges and later a goal for railroads wanting to reach the cities and towns that had developed along the river. Once the railroad network was built, the barges became inefficient and obsolete and quickly disappeared. At Phillipsburg, NJ, the Morris Canal had a terminus and its abandoned lock gate offers a view of the conqueror crossing the river. This line is presently owned and operated by Norfolk Southern, whose Portland Turn is seen making the crossing on the former L&HR bridge. Barges would enter this portal from the Delaware River to ascend Plane 11 West, an inclined plan with a rise of 35 feet. With the gate closed, water would lift the barge onto a rail-based carriage that was pulled up the plane by a water-powered turbine. This was the first of 23 planes that brought the barges over the hills and 102 mile journey to Jersey City and the Hudson River.

The Delaware River was originally a conduit for commerce by barges and later a goal for railroads wanting to reach the cities and towns that had developed along the river. Once the railroad network was built, the barges became inefficient and obsolete and quickly disappeared. At Phillipsburg, NJ, the Morris Canal had a terminus and its abandoned lock gate offers a view of the conqueror crossing the river. This line is presently owned and operated by Norfolk Southern, whose Portland Turn is seen making the crossing on the former L&HR bridge. Barges would enter this portal from the Delaware River to ascend Plane 11 West, an inclined plan with a rise of 35 feet. With the gate closed, water would lift the barge onto a rail-based carriage that was pulled up the plane by a water-powered turbine. This was the first of 23 planes that brought the barges over the hills and 102 mile journey to Jersey City and the Hudson River.

An Amtrak train distrupts the winter stillness at Quiambog Cove as it crosses the causeway on its jouney south. Taken at December 11, 2015 near Stonington, CT.

An Amtrak train distrupts the winter stillness at Quiambog Cove as it crosses the causeway on its jouney south. Taken at December 11, 2015 near Stonington, CT.

An Amtrak Empire service train emerges from the fog as it passes under the Bear Mountain Bridge enroute to New York on December, 30, 2015.

An Amtrak Empire service train emerges from the fog as it passes under the Bear Mountain Bridge enroute to New York on December, 30, 2015.

Opposing means of transportation press on through the ice and snow along the Hudson River. The river is a vital artery for both means of transportation.

Opposing means of transportation press on through the ice and snow along the Hudson River. The river is a vital artery for both means of transportation.

1 Comment

  1. All the photos are amazing, but for me the last one featuring the Hudson and the train toiling away in the background makes me appreciate what trains can do and how they bring benefits to all.

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